People

DIRECTOR

Jutta Joormann is a Professor in the Department of Psychology. She received her doctoral degree from the Free University of Berlin and joined the Yale Psychology Department in 2014 after working at Stanford University, the University of Miami and Northwestern University. Her main areas of interest include the identification of cognitive risk factors for depression, research on the comorbidity of anxiety and depression, and research on social anxiety disorder. Her current work examines attention and memory processes in depression and how these are linked to rumination and emotion dysregulation. In her work, she integrates a multitude of measures, including cognitive tasks, psychophysiological measures of stress reactivity and regulation, eye tracking, neuroendocrine assessments, genotying, and brain imaging. She is currently an Associate Editor of Journal of Abnormal Psychology and of the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology.

E-mail: jutta.joormann@yale.edu

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Postdoctoral Fellows

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Reuma Gadassi is a Rothschild Postdoctoral Fellow in the ARC lab. She received her doctoral degree in Psychology from Bar-Ilan University, and her M.A. in Educational and Clinical Child Psychology (with honors), and B.A. in Psychology and Literature (with high honors) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Reuma’s research focuses on the affective and interpersonal aspects of depression and personality disorders. She is currently working on a project investigating risk factors for depression development. Specifically, she examines affective reactivity and regulation in response to interpersonal events in adolescents at familial risk for depression. To approach these questions she uses various methods, including cognitive tasks, experience-sampling methods, and brain imaging.

E-mail: reuma.gadassipolack@yale.edu

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GRADUATE STUDENTS

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Elizabeth (Libby) Lewis is a sixth-year graduate student in the ARC lab. Libby is currently on internship at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School. She received her BA from Cornell University in 2012, with a major in psychology and a minor in music. Before coming to Yale, she worked at NIMH in the Section on Affective Cognitive Neuroscience with James and Karina Blair, with whom she investigated the neural and cognitive underpinnings of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobia in adults. She uses multiple methodologies, including eye tracking, peripheral psychophysiology, and neuroimaging, to approach questions involving the relation between cognition and emotion in processes that are cardinal to mood and anxiety disorders, such as worry and rumination. 

E-mail: elizabeth.lewis@yale.edu

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Ema Tanovic is a sixth-year graduate student in clinical psychology. She is currently on internship at Pennsylvania Hospital/University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia. Before coming to Yale, she graduated with high honors from Wesleyan University in 2014. Broadly, Ema’s research investigates the cognitive, affective, and behavioral mechanisms of anxiety. She is particularly interested in characterizing how people respond to uncertainty and how excessive responses in uncertain situations may confer risk for the development of internalizing psychopathology. To ask these questions, Ema uses various methods, including event-related potentials, peripheral psychophysiology, and behavioral tasks. Her dissertation focused on the development of a novel paradigm to study avoidance under uncertain threat. Ema will be joining The Boston Consulting Group as a Consultant after graduation. 

E-mail: ema.tanovic@yale.edu

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Colin Stanton is a fifth-year graduate student in clinical psychology. He graduated from McGill University in 2010. Before arriving at Yale, Colin worked under the supervision of Dr. Randy Auerbach, with whom he investigated behavioral and neurobiological factors that contribute to depression in adolescents. His research currently focuses on anhedonia, the loss of pleasure and/or lack of motivation associated with several psychiatric conditions, including depression. Colin is particularly interested in understanding the links between psychological stress and anhedonia from a cognitive and neurobiological perspective.

E-mail: colin.stanton@yale.edu

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Ashleigh Rutherford is a second-year graduate student in clinical psychology. She graduated from Amherst College in 2016 with an honors degree in Psychology and English. Before arriving at Yale, Ashleigh worked under the supervision of Dr. Diego Pizzagalli at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School multi-modally studying differential reward processing abnormalities that contribute to unipolar and bipolar depression. Her research currently focuses on cognitive mechanisms—particularly working memory—that may contribute to anhedonia in major depression.

E-mail: ashleigh.rutherford@yale.edu

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PHD ALUMNI

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Michael Vanderlind received his B.S. in Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin in 2011 and completed his internship at Weill Cornell Medical College/New-York Presbyterian Hospital. His research examines how people respond to positive emotion and how individual differences in the regulation of positive emotion relate to affective psychopathology, particularly major depression. Michael also studies how clinical disorders and emotion dysregulation more generally affect cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and executive control. Michael uses multiple research methods, such as neuropsychological tests, clinical interviews, and electroencephalography, to address these aims. In his spare time, Michael enjoys eating his way through New York City, running along the East River, and returning to New Haven to visit his lab mates.​

E-mail: michael.vanderlind@yale.edu

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Hannah Raila is currently a postdoctoral research at Stanford University, where she studies visual attention to obsession-related cues in OCD. She received her PhD in 2018 from Yale University, where she bridged cognitive and clinical labs to study how the visual “diet” of information that we consume underlies both positive emotion and psychopathology. To explore such topics, she primarily uses eye tracking, continuous flash suppression (CFS), and behavioral tasks.

E-mail: hannah.raila@yale.edu

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Meghan Quinn is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Vanderbilt University. She received her PhD in 2017 from Northwestern University. Her research examines individual differences in stress-sensitive cognitive processes and physiological systems. The goal of this work is to identify factors contributing to depression.

E-mail: meghan.quinn@vanderbilt.edu

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Kimberly Arditte  graduated in 2016 from the University of Miami. She is currently an Advanced Research Fellow in Women’s Mental Health at the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Her research focuses on identifying and attenuating transdiagnostic risk, including cognitive, emotional, and trauma-related factors, for affective disorders in women. She is also increasingly interested in trauma-related rumination as a factor that may explain the comorbidity between PTSD and depression and may represent a transdiagnostic target of intervention. She continues to collaborate with Dr. Joormann and other members of the ARC lab on projects related to these interests.

E-mail: kimberly.ardittehall@va.gov

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Vera Vine is currently an NIH T32 Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh/Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She graduated from Harvard University with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. As a graduate student at Yale, where she earned a doctorate in 2016, she studied the role of emotional awareness in emotion regulation, depressive rumination, and mood-related disorders. Currently her work focuses on the role of self-awareness of emotional and physiological states in predicting emotion regulation difficulties and the prospective onset and course of depression among at-risk individuals.

E-mail: vera.vine@yale.edu

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Catherine D’Avanzato is currently a psychologist in the Rhode Island Hospital Partial Hospital Program, within the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University Medical School.  She graduated from Northwestern University in 2005 and was a graduate student in the lab from 2007 to 2012.  Her research investigates the role of cognitive and biological processes in difficulties with emotion regulation among individuals with depression and anxiety disorders.  Her dissertation examined the relation between cognitive biases with the effectiveness of reappraisal, indicated by self-reported mood and physiological indices.  Her current research focuses on integrating empirically supported assessment and intervention techniques into routine clinical settings, with the goal of enhancing effective emotion regulation among individuals with these disorders within a partial hospital setting. 

E-mail: catherine_davanzato@brown.edu

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Tanya Tran is currently a Staff Psychologist at the Rhode Island Hospital Mood Disorders Program.  She graduated with Honors from the University of Pennsylvania in 2004 and received her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Miami in 2012. She recently completed a research fellowship in the Psychosocial Research Program at Butler Hospital through the Alpert Medical School of Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium. The primary goal of her research is to gain a better understanding of how basic cognitive processes and individual differences in emotion regulation (ER) increase vulnerability to, maintain, and hinder recovery from mood and anxiety disorders. By examining cognitive factors which contribute to the onset and maintenance of depression, she also hopes to develop more effective treatment and prevention programs. Currently, she is examining the role of social media sites, such as Facebook, on emotion regulation and their subsequent impact on emotional well-being. She intends to apply this line of research to develop a novel, Internet-based intervention for depression to reach a broader population.

E-mail: tanya_tran@brown.edu

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Joelle LeMoult received her doctoral degree from the University of Miami in 2012 and is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. The overarching goal of her research is to further our understanding of the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of major depressive disorder. Using a multimodal approach, she examines cognitive, biological, and comorbid factors that, in interaction with environmental stressors, contribute to depressive symptoms. A related line of her work aims to translate this knowledge into clinical applications that improve treatment for depression.  

E-mail: jlemoult@stanford.edu