People

DIRECTOR

Jutta Joormann is a Professor in the Department of Psychology. She received her doctoral degree from the Free University of Berlin and joined the Yale Psychology Department in 2014 after working at Stanford University, the University of Miami and Northwestern University. Her main areas of interest include the identification of cognitive risk factors for depression, research on the comorbidity of anxiety and depression, and research on social anxiety disorder. Her current work examines attention and memory processes in depression and how these are linked to rumination and emotion dysregulation. In her work, she integrates a multitude of measures, including cognitive tasks, psychophysiological measures of stress reactivity and regulation, eye tracking, neuroendocrine assessments, genotying, and brain imaging. She is currently an Associate Editor of Journal of Abnormal Psychology and of the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology. She also serves as the Secretary of the Society for Research in Psychopathology (SRP).

E-mail: jutta.joormann@yale.edu

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GRADUATE STUDENTS

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Michael Vanderlind received his B.S. in Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin in 2011 and is currently a sixth-year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology program at Yale University. His research examines the role that positive emotion dysregulation plays in the etiology and maintenance of psychopathology, particularly major depression. Within this framework, his work aims to 1) document the nature of positive emotion dysregulation among healthy and clinical samples and 2) identify cognitive and biological mechanisms of positive emotion dysregulation. These research questions are examined at the individual level and within social contexts. To address these aims, Michael uses multiple research methods such as eye-tracking, psychophysiology, and the event-related potential (ERP) technique. In his spare time, Michael enjoys surveying the local New Haven eateries and seeing shows at Yale Rep and Yale Cabaret with his lab mates.​

E-mail: michael.vanderlind@yale.edu

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Elizabeth (Libby) Lewis is a fourth-year graduate student in the ARC lab. She received her BA from Cornell University in 2012, with a major in psychology and a minor in music. Before coming to Yale, she worked at NIMH in the Section on Affective Cognitive Neuroscience with James and Karina Blair, with whom she investigated the neural and cognitive underpinnings of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobia in adults. She uses multiple methodologies, including eye tracking and neuroimaging, to approach questions involving the relation between cognition and emotion in processes that are cardinal to mood and anxiety disorders, such as worry and rumination. 

E-mail: elizabeth.lewis@yale.edu

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Ema Tanovic is a fourth-year graduate student in clinical psychology. Before coming to Yale, she graduated with high honors from Wesleyan University in 2014. Ema’s research investigates the cognitive and neural mechanisms of comorbid anxiety and depression. She is currently working on projects examining how individuals with internalizing psychopathology think about and anticipate the future, especially when it is uncertain. Her work focuses on understanding how uncertainty affects decision making, emotion, cognitive control, and prospective memory. To ask these questions, Ema utilizes various methods, including event-related potentials, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral tasks.  

E-mail: ema.tanovic@yale.edu

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Colin Stanton is a third-year graduate student in the ARC lab. He received his BA in Psychology from McGill University in 2010. Prior to arriving at Yale, Colin worked under the supervision of Dr. Randy Auerbach at McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, with whom he investigated behavioral and neurobiological factors that contribute to depression in adolescents. Colin is interested in utilizing multiple methods (e.g., EEG, fMRI, eye-tracking) to investigate mechanisms that underlie depression and related disorders.  

E-mail: colin.stanton@yale.edu

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Hannah Raila is exploring how attentional biases underlie both positive emotion and psychopathology, currently focusing on how happy people see the world differently. Before joining us, Hannah studied the neural underpinnings of emotion at Dartmouth College and at the Clinical Brain Disorders Branch at the NIMH. Hannah is currently on internship at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. 

E-mail: hannah.raila@yale.edu

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PHD ALUMNI

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Meghan Quinn is a sixth-year graduate student at Northwestern University. She received her BS in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The overarching goal of her research is to understand vulnerability to psychopathology following exposure to stressful life events. She is currently examining how physiological responses to stress may affect executive control. This project aims to clarify individual differences in emotion regulation ability and vulnerability to psychopathology.

E-mail: m.quinn@u.northwestern.edu

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Kimberly Arditte  graduated in 2016 from the University of Miami. She is currently an Advanced Research Fellow in Women’s Mental Health at the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Her research focuses on identifying and attenuating transdiagnostic risk, including cognitive, emotional, and trauma-related factors, for affective disorders in women. She is also increasingly interested in trauma-related rumination as a factor that may explain the comorbidity between PTSD and depression and may represent a transdiagnostic target of intervention. She continues to collaborate with Dr. Joormann and other members of the ARC lab on projects related to these interests.

E-mail: kimberly.ardittehall@va.gov

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Vera Vine is currently an NIH T32 Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh/Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She graduated from Harvard University with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. As a graduate student at Yale, where she earned a doctorate in 2016, she studied the role of emotional awareness in emotion regulation, depressive rumination, and mood-related disorders. Currently her work focuses on the role of self-awareness of emotional and physiological states in predicting emotion regulation difficulties and the prospective onset and course of depression among at-risk individuals.

E-mail: vera.vine@yale.edu

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Catherine D’Avanzato is currently a psychologist in the Rhode Island Hospital Partial Hospital Program, within the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University Medical School.  She graduated from Northwestern University in 2005 and was a graduate student in the lab from 2007 to 2012.  Her research investigates the role of cognitive and biological processes in difficulties with emotion regulation among individuals with depression and anxiety disorders.  Her dissertation examined the relation between cognitive biases with the effectiveness of reappraisal, indicated by self-reported mood and physiological indices.  Her current research focuses on integrating empirically supported assessment and intervention techniques into routine clinical settings, with the goal of enhancing effective emotion regulation among individuals with these disorders within a partial hospital setting. 

E-mail: catherine_davanzato@brown.edu

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Tanya Tran is currently a Staff Psychologist at the Rhode Island Hospital Mood Disorders Program.  She graduated with Honors from the University of Pennsylvania in 2004 and received her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Miami in 2012. She recently completed a research fellowship in the Psychosocial Research Program at Butler Hospital through the Alpert Medical School of Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium. The primary goal of her research is to gain a better understanding of how basic cognitive processes and individual differences in emotion regulation (ER) increase vulnerability to, maintain, and hinder recovery from mood and anxiety disorders. By examining cognitive factors which contribute to the onset and maintenance of depression, she also hopes to develop more effective treatment and prevention programs. Currently, she is examining the role of social media sites, such as Facebook, on emotion regulation and their subsequent impact on emotional well-being. She intends to apply this line of research to develop a novel, Internet-based intervention for depression to reach a broader population.

E-mail: tanya_tran@brown.edu

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Joelle LeMoult received her doctoral degree from the University of Miami in 2012 and is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. The overarching goal of her research is to further our understanding of the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of major depressive disorder. Using a multimodal approach, she examines cognitive, biological, and comorbid factors that, in interaction with environmental stressors, contribute to depressive symptoms. A related line of her work aims to translate this knowledge into clinical applications that improve treatment for depression.  

E-mail: jlemoult@stanford.edu

CURRENT LAB MEMBERS

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Mariah Corey is a post-baccalaureate student in the Emerging Scholars Initiative Post-baccalaureate Research Education Program. She received her B.S in Psychology from Kennesaw State University where she was a part of the Affective Neuroscience lab under the supervision of Dr. Ebony Glover. She is interested in research investigating factors that contribute to disparities in the prevalence of mental health disorders including race/ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status. Currently, she is working on an independent research project that investigates how emotion regulation strategies associated with depression differ cross-culturally.

E-mail: mariah.corey@yale.edu

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Jonas Everaert is a postdoctoral research fellow in the ARC lab. He received his PhD under the supervision of Dr. Ernst Koster at Ghent University, Belgium. The overarching goal of his research is to understand how risk factors for emotional disorders work together. His ongoing research is particularly concerned with the interplay between emotional biases in basic and higher-order cognitive processes as well as distorted emotion regulation strategies linked to symptoms of depression.

E-mail: jonas.everaert@yale.edu

ResearchGate: www.researchgate.net/profile/Jonas_Everaert

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Shanta Dey is a third-year graduate student visiting from The University of New South Wales, Australia. Her research investigates the effects of rumination on decision-making in depression. During her time at the ARC Lab, she has been examining the relationships between rumination, post-decisional regret, counterfactual thinking, and behavioural passivity versus proactivity.

E-mail: s.dey@student.unsw.edu.au

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Ivan Blanco is a third-year graduate student visiting from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). His research primarily examines the role of cognitive biases in depression. He is currently developing cognitive bias modification paradigms to examine if changes in cognitive biases (mainly attentional and memory biases) are related to changes in depression symptoms. He is also interested in the role that positive emotions play in psychopathology.

E-mail: ivan.blanco-martinez@yale.edu

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Luise Pruessner is a third-year graduate student visiting from Heidelberg University, Germany. She is interested in using multiple research methodologies (e.g. EEG, fMRI, psychophysiology, self-report) to investigate the role of emotion regulation in the development, maintenance and psychotherapy of anxiety disorders and depression. Specifically, she is interested in affective and cognitive mechanisms underlying the habitual use of emotion regulation strategies, such as rumination, reappraisal and avoidance, and how these can be used to inform interventions for depression and anxiety disorders.

E-mail: luise.pruessner@yale.edu

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Faizah Alaoui is a junior psychology major in Silliman College. She is originally from Rabat, Morocco and is most interested in better understanding the various connections between emotion regulation and psychopathology– especially with regards to mood disorders and depression.  

E-mail: faizah.alaoui@yale.edu

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Michael Berry is a senior psychology major in Berkeley College hoping to pursue the neuroscience track. He is most interested in understanding how biological factors can influence psychopathology, in particular disorders related to mood, anxiety and substance abuse. He hopes to pursue graduate studies in either clinical psychology or clinical neuroscience. 

E-mail: michael.berry@yale.edu

Kaylan (Kaye) Burchfield is a junior Psychology major in Trumbull College, and she hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology after graduation. She is interested in psychopathology, emotional intelligence, social psychology, and Autism. In the lab, Kaye focuses on the visual and cognitive biases of those with depression and anxiety. 

E-mail: kaylan.burchfield@yale.edu

Sierra Conine: I’m a junior in Trumbull College majoring in psychology on the neuro track. I recently started premed requirements because I’m thinking I want to pursue medical school for clinical psychology or neurology. I’m specifically interested in the role genetics and brain biology play in mood disorders.  

E-mail: sierra.conine@yale.edu

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Paige Cunningham  is a sophomore in Pierson College, a prospective double major in Psychology and Religious Studies, and originally hails from England. She is interested in the causes, triggers, and aggravating stimuli of negative affect in addition to the cultural variances in the recognition and treatment of mental disorders. Paige is excited to be able to work with the ARC team to conduct research that will expand her understanding of depression and anxiety disorders. She plans to eventually obtain a PhD in Psychology and pursue a career in clinical therapy.  

E-mail: paige.cunningham@yale.edu

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Mary DuBois is a senior psychology major and premed student in Saybrook College. She joined the ARC lab at the beginning of 2016, and will write her thesis in the lab this coming spring. She is particularly interested in mental health and its connection with early cognitive development. Mary hopes to work in health care consulting immediately after graduation and is also interested in attending medical school later on. 

E-mail: mary.dubois@yale.edu

Yuki Hayashi is a senior in Ezra Stiles majoring in Psychology, neuroscience. Enrolled in the 5 year joint Master’s degree program at the Yale School of Public Health, she aspires to connect neuroscience research to public health interventions in order to provide effective and accessible mental healthcare to minority populations. 

E-mail: yuki.hayashi@yale.edu

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Nubia Jackson is a junior Psychology major in Trumbull College. She began working within the ARC lab during the spring semester of 2016. She is interested in exploring the effects of traumatic experiences on individuals—particularly how adverse environments may contribute to the development of psychopathology. Nubia hopes to pursue a PhD and career in the field of clinical psychology.  

E-mail: nubia.jackson@yale.edu

Victoria Lawlor is a psychology major at Northeastern University and completed her co-op here at the ARC lab. She is interested in the cognitive biases contributing to anxiety disorders and hopes to pursue to a PhD in clinical psychology.

E-mail: lawlor.v@husky.neu.edu 

Cole Moran is a junior in Morse College majoring in psychology.  He is generally interested in the mechanisms that support and maintain anxiety and depression. More specifically, he is curious about the specific ways in which mindfulness-based interventions may attenuate maladaptive behaviors in people with co-morbid anxiety and depression

E-mail:cole.moran@yale.edu 

Nolan Sheridan , a junior at Yale, has been working with children his entire life, from his mother’s at-home daycare to the Child Conduct Clinic here at Yale. His particular interest is how different attachment styles during children’s youth affects their later psychopathology, and how these attachment style proportions differ in different populations. He plans on pursuing a doctoral degree in applied child psychology after graduation. At the ARC lab, he works with Jonas, focusing on inhibitory control.

E-mail: nolan.sheridan@yale.edu 

Katherine Soderberg is a sophomore psychology (neuroscience) major in Branford College. She is broadly interested in the biological underpinnings of psychological disorders. More specifically, she is interested in the neural correlates of depression and the relationship between social cognition and psychopathology.

E-mailkatherine.soderberg@yale.edu

Andrea Wiglesworth is a Junior Psychology major in Berkeley College. She has worked within the ARC lab for the past two semesters, helping with behavioral studies on intolerance of uncertainty. She has also been a research assistant for the Medical Research Unit- Pain Treatment Services on opioid dependencies as well as Native American health issues.

E-mailandrea.wiglesworth@yale.edu

Elizabeth Zordani is a junior psychology major in Silliman College. She is most interested in understanding the interaction between rumination and worry with cognitive and biological processes. She is also interested in understanding how rumination and worry affect both long term and short term memory in people suffering from depression and anxiety. She hopes to pursue graduate studies in clinical psychology.

E-mailelizabeth.zordani@yale.edu